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Becoming Your Best Self in 2017

Ten steps toward a fuller, healthier, and more God-centered Life

“I have come so you may have life and have it to the full” — John 10:10
new_yearThis new year is still an opportunity to start fresh and to recommit to live a fuller, healthier, more joy-filled and—most importantly—God-centered life. I have been reviewing a number of articles about how to live a happier life in 2017. Some of them speak about shedding bad habits such as drinking too much, smoking, and spending countless hours on the couch; the articles also refer to developing good habits such as regular exercise, a healthy diet, and a positive attitude. I have chosen to highlight 10 practices that you might want to consider.
A spiritually healthy person is healthy in mind, body, and spirit. All things are interconnected, including the mind, the body, the spirit, and the environment in which we live. Physical health isn’t merely the absence of disease or symptoms; it is a state of optimal wellbeing, vitality, and wholeness. In the same way, spiritual health isn’t merely the absence of sin or a strict observance of laws; it is state of union with God, a strong sense of self and communion with our neighbor and with all of creation.
I encourage you to choose one or two doable actions to help you love God, self, and others more in 2017. Just do it!

1. Pray more regularly and frequently
It is an important practice to set aside a time each day to pray, give thanks, and reflect on God’s presence in your life. But just as important is praying throughout the day—while in the car, cooking a meal, or waiting on line at the grocery store. I have found it helpful to practice what St. Ignatius Loyola called the Daily Examen. It is a practice of prayerful reflection on the events of the day in order to detect God’s presence and discern his direction for us. I try to do it at the end of my day. Here’s a version of the examen for you to use.
2. Be more focused during Mass
I sometimes find myself at Mass thinking about a work situation or about what I plan to do after Mass. The best way for me to be more present at Mass is to come 10 minutes early and center myself on God; pray with the day’s scripture readings; and, when distractions come, acknowledge them and then let them go.
3. Do weekly acts of mercy
These are conscious acts that can be very ordinary but are done intentionally. An act of mercy can be as simple as holding a door for a stranger or volunteering at a homeless shelter or going to a wake service.
4. Complain Less
The first step in complaining less is to recognize how much you complain. It sometimes feels good to complain, but you do not fix anything by complaining. Constant complaining might condition you to always look for what’s bad in situations. When you become aware that you are complaining, redirect your attention to something positive about the situation or, better yet, start working on a solution.
5. Avoid dualist thinking
Dualist thinking is categorizing everything and everyone in a clear-cut black-and-white, good-and-bad, either/or way. People who think dualistically are often seeking clarity and security in a changing and sometimes scary world. We sometimes find dualistic thinking in religious persons or groups, and this can result in harsh, exclusive, and judgmental behavior. When you hear yourself talking disparagingly about “those people,” scapegoating, speaking in a judgmental or condemning manner, or categorizing people as liberals or conservatives, sinners or saints, stop and reflect on what is behind your speech. The best way to move beyond dualist thinking is to put yourself in the other’s shoes and imagine why a person acts or thinks in a particular way. Fr. Richard Rohr in one of his meditations writes: the contemplative mind withholds from labeling or categorizing things too quickly (i.e., judging), so it can come to see things in themselves and as themselves, in their uniqueness—apart from the words or concepts that become their substitutes
6. Let go of worry
We can actually worry ourselves sick. We waste lots of time and energy convincing ourselves that everything we worry about will happen. When you find yourself worrying and obsessing, stop, take a long deep breath, reflect on the situation you are in a tizzy about, and ask yourself if there’s any logical basis for your worry. Consciously give this worry—either real or exaggerated— into God’s hands.
7. Move it
Recently, I have had a change in attitude about exercising. I enjoy physical activity and always feel better when I am fit, but I had an either/or attitude. If I did not have time for at least 30 minutes of exercise, I would not work out that day. I am now more consciously trying to move more throughout the day. If I miss my morning exercise, I will take a walk during my lunch break or do 10 minutes of exercise in my office. I always take the stairs and try to walk instead of drive whenever possible. I love my Fitbit and it has motivated me to take more steps and move every hour. Here’s an 8-minute cardio workout you can do at home.
8. Get more sleep
Sleep isn’t essential just to recharge our bodies. It plays an important role in all aspects of our health, from maintaining a healthy weight to improving our disposition, to being more mindful as we pray. The experts tell us the most important way to get enough sleep is keeping a consistent sleep/wake schedule. When your schedule is all over the place, your body clock doesn’t have a chance to normalize. So start tracking your sleep schedule, and work towards consistency, starting with your wake-up time. Here are some tips on how to sleep better.
9. Enjoy nature
Get outside and enjoy whatever season it is. A sunny winter day can be a great time for a walk if you wear the proper layers. Be intentional about spending time in God’s beautiful creation.
10. Accept yourself
The worst thing you can do to your self-image is compare yourself to others. We are all imperfect, vulnerable, and wonderfully made by God from love and to love. We all have different strengths and talents to be used for God’s purpose. If you have old tapes reeling in your head telling you aren’t good enough, that you’re too short or too fat, redirect your thoughts to the God that created your and repeat the phrase from Psalm 139: You are “fearfully wonderfully made.”

Sr. Terry Rickard is the Executive Director of RENEW International and a Dominican Sister from Blauvelt, NY.

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3 Responses to “Becoming Your Best Self in 2017”

  1. I enjoyed the 10 tips…things we probably all know already but excellent reminders of how we can improve our lives. Thanks Terry!

  2. Ed Thomas says:

    Sister Terry,
    All great thoughts and so relevant in today’s world. I shared with our daughter Lisa.

  3. John Bartelloni says:

    Great suggestions, Sister Terry.

    Am glad to hear that I am not alone in being unfocused at mass.

    I do try to dedicate that time to God and usually leave wristwatch in my Jeep.

    Ditto for cell phone.

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